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How to Remove Water Stains on a Quartzite Countertop

Q. We have water-like stains on the edges of our quartzite counters and water intrusion around the sink area. How do we get it out? Should we call a plumber? What will a plumber do? Do I have to dry it out prior to sealing the areas? I imagine I do? We have stains on almost every corner of our counters... and the sink is very bad. This bleeding is darkening through time. Since we have been home more, it’s gotten worse and areas we use more often have this type of problem. Areas we don’t use too often look fine. Could it be that it is water intrusion from wiping countertops daily with a wet towel? The counters did not have the bleed after installation. Our stone tops were sealed by the seller/manufacturer. After they were installed they were never sealed.

A. Thanks for contacting us about your stone problem. First things first. If the stone is sealed properly, it should not be absorbing moisture from being wiped with wet towels. If this is a moisture problem, a plumber will need to identify the source of moisture and resolve the moisture problem first. The stone will dry out all on its own. Running an air conditioner or dehumidifier will help speed the drying time. If this is not a moisture issue, then the problem is probably silicone staining. Discoloration from moisture will look identical to a silicone stain. A poultice is not likely to have any effect on a silicone stain. You are welcome to try a poultice, as it will not damage the stone at all, however, be aware that the stone may draw moisture from the poultice you've applied, resulting in further (covering a greater area) darkening of the stone. This moisture will dry out, and the appearance of the stone will return to the state it was before the poultice was applied. A professional restoration contractor may be able to torch out discoloration from silicone, depending on what type of silicone was used and if, in fact, this discoloration is silicone staining. If poulticing does not work and the professional restoration contractor is unable to remove the discoloration, the stone will need to be replaced. 

Q. I have had some success in pulling some stains out completely using the poultice, and the other areas are lightening. Is using a heat gun or torching recommended at this time? The poultice is taking a very long time and feeling extremely hard to deal with as it’s messy. Thanks for your help and guidance thus far.

A. We're so glad you are having some success with poulticing. You can either continue to poultice (with no guarantee it will keep working to completely resolve the problem), call a PRO to attempt the torch method, or replace the tops. To find a Certified SurpHaces PRO Partner near you, contact us. Poulticing definitely takes time and patience!
Need a PRO for your floor and surface care needs? We'd love to help you out. Contact us.
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